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10 Great Depression Hacks Every Homesteader Should Know

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My grandparents still practice Great Depression hacks regularly. To them, these Great Depression hacks are more like habits. 

They remember times when there wasn’t enough money to feed their whole family, so they subsisted on ketchup sandwiches. 

Every bite was precious.

So, the idea of the grandkids not eating every bite on their plates horrified my grandparents.

Likewise, my grandparents continue to do many things the “old-fashioned” way, such as line-drying clothes.

To them, this is normal and practical.

For today’s generation, it may seem a bit inconvenient.

But truthfully, it’s wise. Today’s generation has become so attached to modern conveniences that they will struggle if SHTF.

Homesteaders, on the other hand, are always looking for ways to be more self-sufficient.

One of the best ways to embrace self-sufficiency is to embrace the following Great Depression hacks. 

Stirring a large potful of stew.

1. Find Ways to Extend Meals 

During the Great Depression, meat was an extravagance. However, people understood the necessity of protein and full bellies.

That’s why many home cooks used meal extenders, such as rice, lentils, and beans.

These meal extenders helped stretch the food they could afford and provided the calories people needed. 

Knowing how to turn a bit of meat and vegetables into a full, satisfying meal is a hack all homesteaders should know. 

2. Make Your Own Cleaning and Beauty Products

One of the most useful Great Depression hacks is using everyday products to make your own cleaning or beauty products.

For example, if you have items such as baking soda, vinegar, and essential oils, you can whip up DIY cleaning products.

[Related Read: The Homesteader’s Guide to Making DIY Cleaning Products from Scratch]

In addition to using baking soda and vinegar for DIY cleaning products, you can also use everyday pantry items to make your own beauty products. 

For example, combine 2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar and 3 tablespoons of baking soda to make a face mask that will help clean and clear acne-prone skin. 

3. Waste Not, Want Not

During the Great Depression, people understood the value of products.

For instance, they knew they didn’t have money to keep returning to the drug store or grocery store, so they made sure to only use what they needed.

They followed the “just a dab” mantra. 

By only using just a dab (or just what was needed), they ensured they would have enough to last for a while.

Make a point to do the same on your homestead. 

Use just a dab of lotion and invest in a “last drop” spatula to make sure you get your money’s worth. 

A home compost bin piled high with leftover food scraps.

4. Save Your Scraps

My grandparents seemed to save everything – including scraps.

This is another Great Depression hack.

They learned that even scraps serve a purpose.

Citrus peels can be added to DIY cleaning products.

Leftover produce and bones can be used to make stocks and broths.

My grandparents still collect bacon grease in an old Crisco container for cooking. 

If you can’t think of a purpose for your scraps in the homestead, add them to your compost pile where they will help create rich fertilizer. 

[Related Read: Composting Made Easy: Tips for the Homestead]

5. Learn Natural Medicinal Remedies

People didn’t have the money for medical care during the Great Depression, so they relied on their own knowledge of home remedies.

For example, they would drink warm honey tea to treat a sore throat.

If someone had sore muscles, they would apply a plaster of mustard powder. 

Here is a recipe from Herb Wisdom.

Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons of flour
  • 2 tablespoons dry mustard
  • lukewarm water

Directions

  1. Combine the ingredients to make a paste that is not too watery.
  2. Spread the mustard paste on half a piece of 100% flannel.
  3. Fold over the other half to make a package.
  4. Apply the poultice to the body.
  5. Leave it on for up to 20 minutes.

Learning how to use medicinal herbs and other natural home remedies is a great skill for homesteaders. 

6. Repurpose and Upcycle

Those living through the Great Depression would never throw something away before carefully considering if it had any other uses.

Empty food jars and shoe boxes were used as storage containers.

One of the most popular examples is how they used flour sacks and feed bags to make dresses for little girls.

Old, worn-out clothes were turned into cleaning rags.

Homesteaders should embrace this same mentality. 

Invest in a sewing machine and learn how to mend clothes rather than buy new ones. 

An outside table loaded with food options at a potluck.

7. Embrace Potlucks

Homesteading is all about self-sufficiency, but that doesn’t mean turning your back on your neighbors.

During the Great Depression, communities came together to make sure one another made it through the tough times.

One way they did so was to embrace potlucks.

Each family would bring a dish to a community gathering, and the community would be fed.

Potlucks still work the same way.

Learn how to make a quick, budget-friendly potluck dish that you can prepare whenever a neighbor is in need or when the community comes together.

8. Use Less Water

Instead of paying a high water bill, use Great Depression hacks to save money.

Make a point to only run your laundry machine or dishwasher when you have a full load.

Add a brick to your toilet tank. This will help you conserve the amount of water used to fill the tank between flushes. 

9. Preserve Food

I haven’t touched on growing your own food because this is typically one of the first things homesteaders do.

However, one of the more important Great Depression hacks is to learn how to preserve the food you grow.

You don’t want to waste it.

Learn how to can, dehydrate, and freeze-dry food appropriately to ensure you use up all of your valuable food.

10. Use Your Hands and Feet

During the Great Depression, folks chose to use their hands and their feet before they paid for something.

Instead of paying for gas and driving a car, they rode bikes or walked.

Instead of using a dryer, they line-dried their clothes.

Instead of using the dishwasher, they hand-washed dishes.

Instead of taking their car to a mechanic, they learned how to do basic car repairs (such as oil changes) themselves.

[See Also: 25+ Homestead Hacks That Will Make Life Easier]

Source link: https://survivaljack.com/2023/07/10-great-depression-hacks-every-homesteader-should-know/ by Survival Jane at survivaljack.com

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Off Grid

Homestead Automation: Work Smarter – Survival Jack

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Homesteading is a dream come true for many, but that doesn’t mean it’s simple or easy. 

For a homestead to succeed, you have to invest a lot of time and energy.

That’s why it is important to consider automating as much as possible!

When we discuss homestead automation, we’re talking about doing whatever you can to automate things that will make your life easier, cut your chore time in half, and aid you in remembering to do something.

Today, homestead automation tends to involve smart features or using the Internet of Things to control the homestead.

However, homestead automation can also mean building DIY gravity chicken feeders.

The key is building systems that help you do less, such as feeding your chickens.

But that’s not the only reason for homestead automation.

With homestead automation, you can do everything from feeding and watering your animals to irrigating your garden, controlling temperatures inside coops and greenhouses, and protecting your animals and family from predators.

Let’s look at some of the ways homestead automation can make your homestead more efficient.

Automated security spotlights turning on at the presence of a deer.

Automating Security

Security is paramount.

In addition to protecting your family and home from those who could do you harm, automated security features can also protect your animals and garden.

Here are some examples.

  • Chicken doors: An automated chicken door makes raising chickens easier. You can set a time for the door to open and close. This will make it even more difficult for predators to get to your coop during the evening hours. It will also save you time in the mornings.
  • Motion Sensors: Motion sensors around the homestead can also protect your flock from predators. In addition, you can set up automation that not only produces light but also turns on sounds (such as talk radio playing) to deter deer from eating the produce in your garden. 
  • Cameras: You can set up cameras along your homestead property to capture stills at certain times or if triggered by motion sensors. There are also some motion cameras that connect to your smartphone so you can livestream whatever has triggered the camera.
  • Timed Lights: A basic security feature every home should utilize is a timer for lights. These are extremely helpful when you travel to give off the look of someone being at home. 
Cows eating from a feed trough.

Food & Water Automation

There are many daily chores on a homestead.

Imagine if you could avoid some of these daily chores and save time with homestead automation…

One such daily chore that can be automated is feeding and watering your animals.

Rather than feeding your animals daily (or multiple times a day), you can use an automated feed and water system. 

Fortunately, there are numerous ways this can be accomplished.

For example, you can invest in a smart animal feeder that allows you to store several gallons of feed and set a digital timer to release the food at certain times.

Or you can build a DIY chicken feeder that is gravity-released. 

This doesn’t require batteries or a connection to the internet, but it still releases food as needed over the course of several days.

  • Automated Feeders: You can find high-tech app-controlled smart feeders or build your own gravity-released automated feeder. If the smart device is too much for your taste, you can build a feeder that operates with a timed release.
  • Automated Waterers: Animals must always have access to water. You can build an automated DIY chicken watering system or a gravity-released watering system. Typically, these hold several gallons of water so that you can go days without refilling.
  • Stock Tank Floats: Stock tank float valves are an old-fashioned way to automate water systems. The stock tank float controls the water level in stock tanks, troughs, and barrels. When water goes below the float, the valve opens, which allows more water to refill the trough. 

Automating Irrigation Systems

In addition to drinking water for their animals, homesteaders can automate irrigation systems to ensure their crops get the water they need. 

  • Timers for Watering Gardens:  A simple way to automate watering is to use controlled timers. Simply connect water sources/sprinklers to timers and your watering is automated.
  • Irrigation Systems: You can purchase or build an automated irrigation system for your outdoor gardens and your greenhouse, such as hose timers that work with drip irrigation. You can install a gravity-fed irrigation system. There are also smart sprinklers and smart irrigation systems available that allow you to control when you water, how much you water, and more. 
Someone using an app on their phone to turn on their lights.

Homestead Automation for Electricity

If you find yourself spending a lot of time simply turning things on and off around the homestead, you may want to consider automating some of these basic functions using smart plugs.

Smart plugs are power plugs connected to Wi-Fi that act like remote-controlled power switches

With a smart plug, you can control most basic functions using an app. For example, you can install a smart plug inside your chicken coop that allows you to turn on and off the lights as needed. 

Similarly, if you utilize plant lights indoors, you can use smart plugs to control these lights or schedule them to operate at different times. 

You can even use a smart plug to control the air or heat inside different homestead spaces (such as turning on a fan or turning on a brooder light).

Automate Temperature

Temperature is extremely important for homesteads in different areas.

A too-hot greenhouse will result in dead plants. A too-cold water dish will result in dehydration.

[Related Read: Stop Your Livestocks’ Water from Freezing]

Here are some ways you can use automation for temperature control. 

  • Coop Temperature: There are temperature sensors that you can use that will turn off heat lamps when they get too hot and turn lamps on when the temperature gets too cool.
  • Greenhouse Temperature: It is necessary to keep temperatures in greenhouses stable. With smart controls, you can receive notifications when greenhouse temperatures change. You can also automate temperature changes, such as heating up and cooling down when certain temperatures are sensed.
  • Water Dish Heater: You can automate a water heater to turn on when the outside temperature gets below freezing to ensure the water trough doesn’t ice over. 

[Related Read: 25+ Homestead Hacks That Will Make Life Easier]

Source link: https://survivaljack.com/2024/02/homestead-automation-work-smarter/ by Survival Jack at survivaljack.com

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Homestead Financial Planning for the New Year

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Homesteading offers a more free way to live. You are more self-sufficient and less dependent. But, if you don’t do any homestead financial planning, you may not feel as free as you’d like.

If you aren’t careful, your homesteading dreams could lead you into debt instead of freeing you.

The best way to avoid debt and to better your situation is to do a little homestead financial planning at the start of the new year.

Homestead financial planning includes the following steps.

A watering can laying on its side in a dilapidated garden.

Review and Reflect

Before you start making any plans for how to save or spend money in the new year, take some time to pause and reflect.

Think about this past year on the homestead.

  • What worked well? 
  • What failed? 
  • What would you like to do differently? 
  • What was too much work for too little reward? 
  • What could you improve?

Your reflection should drive your goals for the new year.

Release the Joneses

Many homesteaders started homesteading because they wanted to live differently from their peers. 

They wanted to be more self-sufficient and less attached to modern conveniences.

However, even in the homesteading world, there is a heavy dose of “keeping up with the Joneses.”

If you find yourself comparing your homestead to someone else’s, ask yourself why.

While there are certainly times when it is smart to gather ideas from other homesteaders, if you are simply dreaming of bigger and better because of someone else, you’ve missed the mark.

Accept your homestead for what it is.

Stay humble. Live within your means. Buy what you can afford. Save up. 

A chalkboard with

Set Goals

Now that you’ve reflected on the past year and know where you are financially, it’s time to set some goals.

Think about what you’d like to do on the homestead this year. 

  • Do you need to pay down debt?
  • Is there a project on your to-do that is financially possible?
  • Will you add more animals?
  • Can you plant more or try something different in the garden? 

Create a Basic Budget

Once you have some basic goals in mind, it’s time to create a budget. This is a critical step in homestead financial planning you cannot afford to overlook.

Start with making note of what comes in each month. This is your monthly income.

Then, make a note of what comes out. This includes your necessary expenses, such as utilities.

Homesteaders tend to have a few additional necessary expenses, such as additional heating and cooling for the spaces where they keep their animals. 

Start with these:

  • Household expenses
  • Groceries
  • Gardening supplies
  • Feed for animals
  • Heating/cooling
  • Water
  • Livestock

Make a list of all your necessary expenses and estimate the average cost per month. 

Your monthly income should be more than your monthly expenses.

Make Space for Savings

As long as you are bringing more in than what you are spending, there should be some money you can save each month.

Saving money is important.

Prioritize saving for emergencies. They happen – especially on the homestead.

Set aside some money each month until you have a decent emergency fund.

A homesteader prepping wood for a new project.

Prioritize and Plan for Homesteading Projects

Consider your goals for the new year.

You likely have projects you hope to complete. And most projects cost money.

Make a general list like this one:

  • Repairing structures (i.e., mending fences)
  • Improving structures (i.e., adding an automated chicken feeder)
  • Building new structures (i.e., building a barn)

Figure out the estimated cost for each project.

Then, prioritize the list according to your homestead financial plan and needs.

Everyone’s list will look different, and depending on their homestead financial plan, they will decide how to prioritize these projects differently.

Do what makes the most financial sense for you. 

Set Aside Funds for an Annual Maintenance Fund

Speaking of prioritizing projects, whether homesteaders are fixing something that is broken or building something new, there is always money being spent on maintenance.

You’ll never meet a homesteader who isn’t working on a project.

Make prioritizing your project list easier in the future by saving money monthly for maintenance.

Once you have saved enough for an emergency fund, divert savings into an annual maintenance fund. 

Monitor Spending

Anyone can create a budget, but the hard part is sticking to the budget.

However, if you want to meet your goals and build up your savings, you must monitor your spending.

This is the best way to make sure you aren’t overspending.

There are many apps available that make it easy to track spending and follow a budget, such as FarmRaise

If you discover you are coming close to overspending in certain areas or struggling to save for emergencies or annual maintenance, it’s time to look for ways to reduce costs and increase income.

A homesteader selling homegrown produce at a farmer's market.

Identify Additional Income Sources

When you sat down to make your budget for the year, you may have discovered that you are living beyond your means.

This means you are spending more than you are bringing in.

If this is the case, you need to identify additional income sources.

Fortunately, there are many ways you can make extra money on the homestead, such as selling produce from your garden.

See 30 Homestead Side Hustles for more ideas.

Reduce Costs

Unfortunately, sometimes increasing income with a side hustle isn’t enough.

It is also wise to reduce costs.

Heck, it’s always wise to look for ways to cut costs – whether you have plenty or little!

Here are a few ways to cut costs on the homestead:

  • Buy used clothing and equipment.
  • Embrace DIY. Make your own cleaning products, chicken feed, and do your own repairs.
  • Build a bartering system.
  • Look for free building materials for projects. 
  • Borrow from other homesteaders. For example, ask a friend to borrow tools or equipment.
  • Preserve food. Don’t let any food go to waste.
  • Save seeds. If you learn how to save seeds, you won’t need to spend money every growing season on new seeds.
  • Cut extras. Say goodbye to cable or other entertainment services that aren’t necessary.

Review and Adjust the Financial Plan Regularly

Don’t make the mistake of coming up with a homestead financial plan in January and never revisiting it.

Life happens, and things don’t always go as planned.

You may need to readjust your budget. 

For example, if you set a grocery budget and costs skyrocket as they have in years past, you’ll need to make some adjustments.

Your new income stream may bring in more money than anticipated, which will allow you to save more or start working on a larger homesteading project. 

Most importantly, you want to look back over your budget regularly to make sure you are still on track with meeting your goals. 

Source link: https://survivaljack.com/2024/01/homestead-financial-planning-for-the-new-year/ by Survival Jack at survivaljack.com

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Off Grid

Homestead Automation: Work Smarter – Survival Jack

Published

on

Homesteading is a dream come true for many, but that doesn’t mean it’s simple or easy. 

For a homestead to succeed, you have to invest a lot of time and energy.

That’s why it is important to consider automating as much as possible!

When we discuss homestead automation, we’re talking about doing whatever you can to automate things that will make your life easier, cut your chore time in half, and aid you in remembering to do something.

Today, homestead automation tends to involve smart features or using the Internet of Things to control the homestead.

However, homestead automation can also mean building DIY gravity chicken feeders.

The key is building systems that help you do less, such as feeding your chickens.

But that’s not the only reason for homestead automation.

With homestead automation, you can do everything from feeding and watering your animals to irrigating your garden, controlling temperatures inside coops and greenhouses, and protecting your animals and family from predators.

Let’s look at some of the ways homestead automation can make your homestead more efficient.

Automated security spotlights turning on at the presence of a deer.

Automating Security

Security is paramount.

In addition to protecting your family and home from those who could do you harm, automated security features can also protect your animals and garden.

Here are some examples.

  • Chicken doors: An automated chicken door makes raising chickens easier. You can set a time for the door to open and close. This will make it even more difficult for predators to get to your coop during the evening hours. It will also save you time in the mornings.
  • Motion Sensors: Motion sensors around the homestead can also protect your flock from predators. In addition, you can set up automation that not only produces light but also turns on sounds (such as talk radio playing) to deter deer from eating the produce in your garden. 
  • Cameras: You can set up cameras along your homestead property to capture stills at certain times or if triggered by motion sensors. There are also some motion cameras that connect to your smartphone so you can livestream whatever has triggered the camera.
  • Timed Lights: A basic security feature every home should utilize is a timer for lights. These are extremely helpful when you travel to give off the look of someone being at home. 
Cows eating from a feed trough.

Food & Water Automation

There are many daily chores on a homestead.

Imagine if you could avoid some of these daily chores and save time with homestead automation…

One such daily chore that can be automated is feeding and watering your animals.

Rather than feeding your animals daily (or multiple times a day), you can use an automated feed and water system. 

Fortunately, there are numerous ways this can be accomplished.

For example, you can invest in a smart animal feeder that allows you to store several gallons of feed and set a digital timer to release the food at certain times.

Or you can build a DIY chicken feeder that is gravity-released. 

This doesn’t require batteries or a connection to the internet, but it still releases food as needed over the course of several days.

  • Automated Feeders: You can find high-tech app-controlled smart feeders or build your own gravity-released automated feeder. If the smart device is too much for your taste, you can build a feeder that operates with a timed release.
  • Automated Waterers: Animals must always have access to water. You can build an automated DIY chicken watering system or a gravity-released watering system. Typically, these hold several gallons of water so that you can go days without refilling.
  • Stock Tank Floats: Stock tank float valves are an old-fashioned way to automate water systems. The stock tank float controls the water level in stock tanks, troughs, and barrels. When water goes below the float, the valve opens, which allows more water to refill the trough. 

Automating Irrigation Systems

In addition to drinking water for their animals, homesteaders can automate irrigation systems to ensure their crops get the water they need. 

  • Timers for Watering Gardens:  A simple way to automate watering is to use controlled timers. Simply connect water sources/sprinklers to timers and your watering is automated.
  • Irrigation Systems: You can purchase or build an automated irrigation system for your outdoor gardens and your greenhouse, such as hose timers that work with drip irrigation. You can install a gravity-fed irrigation system. There are also smart sprinklers and smart irrigation systems available that allow you to control when you water, how much you water, and more. 
Someone using an app on their phone to turn on their lights.

Homestead Automation for Electricity

If you find yourself spending a lot of time simply turning things on and off around the homestead, you may want to consider automating some of these basic functions using smart plugs.

Smart plugs are power plugs connected to Wi-Fi that act like remote-controlled power switches

With a smart plug, you can control most basic functions using an app. For example, you can install a smart plug inside your chicken coop that allows you to turn on and off the lights as needed. 

Similarly, if you utilize plant lights indoors, you can use smart plugs to control these lights or schedule them to operate at different times. 

You can even use a smart plug to control the air or heat inside different homestead spaces (such as turning on a fan or turning on a brooder light).

Automate Temperature

Temperature is extremely important for homesteads in different areas.

A too-hot greenhouse will result in dead plants. A too-cold water dish will result in dehydration.

[Related Read: Stop Your Livestocks’ Water from Freezing]

Here are some ways you can use automation for temperature control. 

  • Coop Temperature: There are temperature sensors that you can use that will turn off heat lamps when they get too hot and turn lamps on when the temperature gets too cool.
  • Greenhouse Temperature: It is necessary to keep temperatures in greenhouses stable. With smart controls, you can receive notifications when greenhouse temperatures change. You can also automate temperature changes, such as heating up and cooling down when certain temperatures are sensed.
  • Water Dish Heater: You can automate a water heater to turn on when the outside temperature gets below freezing to ensure the water trough doesn’t ice over. 

[Related Read: 25+ Homestead Hacks That Will Make Life Easier]

Source link: https://survivaljack.com/2024/01/homestead-automation-work-smarter/ by Survival Jack at survivaljack.com

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